I don’t really remember that well.

Something we all say when we try to recall a good dream. I envy the person who remembers every dream they have in a night; think of the ideas lying in those sleep-induced hallucinations! But then, it’s not just what you dream that can inspire you.

Tip of today’s post: Try to recreate dreams, or real life events in your head.

Ever told your friends a life story that you found interesting, like for example, you nearly got run over, or you’ve competed in the marathon? Chances are, you’ve exaggerated that story to grip your audience. (Yeah, that’s right, I’m lookin’ at you.) That in itself is a form of story telling.

But what if you could spontaneously create these stories without them happening in the first place? Picture this:
You’re sat on a small, wooden bench (Unpolished) facing a lake that’s been frozen over, even though it’s sunny. Geese flock the side of the lake, unable to swim in the frozen waters. And the people throw bread and watch the geese swarm and scramble over the food. What happens that involves you?

Just let that mental movie run in your mid for a bit, and sure enough, you’ll think something up. Try it with things you do in your everyday life. Think of something you do daily, and think how it could be better or worse.

Contact info:

Website: https://mantisscribeblog.wordpress.com/ (The hyperlink on my account name is broken, so I put the link here)

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

Plenty of ways to fix this.

Now I’ll admit that while I can think spontaneously, sometimes my ideas tend to be a little stupid. Very stupid, in fact, so as of recently I’ve been forcing myself to think things through a bit more when it comes to my storylines. Sounds like common practice, but to be able to deviate from one’s original plan might be tricky for some.

Tip of today’s post: Change things up if you have to!

Now this doesn’t just apply to storylines, plots or structure. It can refer to your characters too. Perhaps none of your characters fit a specific role in your story, but you don’t wanna make a new one just yet. If you can find some way to change your character without leaving the reader clueless as to why they’ve changed, you’re able to do so much more.

Now overusing this strategy may prove a little dull. We don’t need too much variety. Sometimes it may be better to create a new character or to change up the storyline, just so that your character fits the role as they should. Don’t be scared to scribble something off that planning sheet and replace it with something else. After all, you can always go back to how it originally was, you’re the boss!

Needless to say, though, ensure your changes fit the story. If you end up with a couple of seemingly out of place chapters after doing this, it’ll take a lot of work after you’ve finished your story to fix. Perhaps keep those unfitting chapters archived somewhere for future references; who knows what you can learn from your past self?

 

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

Physics say this…

… Story writers say otherwise. Isn’t it great to be bound by no limitations when you’re writing? We can effectively manipulate anything from gravity to the number of letters in the alphabet, heck, we can even conjure up a completely new language, with the patience and effort put in.

Tip of today’s post: Mess around with parts of your characters, namely the parts you’d be interested in finding an alternative for.

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Take a look around.

Something about Limp Bizkit rocking the set. I dunno.

But seriously, you ever take a moment to just absorb your surroundings? Sometimes you can spot something extremely miniscule that gets you thinking for hours, like a certain place design that you like, or an animal you see as you cross the road. No? Are you not a sponge too?

Tip of today’s post : Keep your eyes peeled, and take real-life things into consideration.

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Expect the unexpected…

There’s one big difference that a novel has from real life, something we all appreciate; the fact that the unexpected happens all the time. We all want something unexpected to happen, it just rarely does, and to include something like this when writing offers the reader the bridge from reality that they need.

Tip of today’s post : Ensure you consider how a character will react t the unexpected.

Just having a character the audience won’t expect isn’t enough, in most instances, and this is because you can get used to a character over time. You have to put them in a situation where they would never have expected to be in, or more importantly, where the reader wouldn’t expect them to be in.

In doing this, you mask various predictable plot points that would otherwise could be blatantly obvious. Say for instance you have a few armed soldiers fighting a militia of sorts. The winner is as obvious as the number of sides on a square. Then you pit them against an ancient vampire species, and things become much less clear. If they’re supposed to win, there’s much more you can do that will be completely alien, yet gripping and original to the reader.

Of course, the reader could be expecting this, and that’s why you have to make scenes like this your own. Do this by changing what happens to match your style, whatever style that may be; the reader wants to see what you can create, not what a Marvel comic or a Disney movie has shown you. (I don’t suggest at all that using these sources or any other for ideas is a bad idea though, just don’t copy them entirely.)

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

Say again?

So one thing that I find has the potential to be quite aggravating is when people completely disregard grammar and blame it on their dialect or accent. Pronunciation has literally nothing to do with sentence structure, but that’s not the point. The point is that bad grammar can make a character humorous.

Tip of today’s post : Keep a character’s dialect and intelligence in mind when writing.

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Take a step back.

So if you’re like me and for some reason have a ton of original characters, you realise that it’s a little difficult to keep all of them in balance. Somehow, one of them always seems left behind and becomes really outdated, and this can be a fatal flaw when writing.

Tip of today’s post: Ensure all of your characters are up to date with your novel.

Ever read a book where a character simply seems to stay the same throughout the entirety of the story? I can wager that this is also the character that people aren’t really interested in, as they’d rather see how the others are evolving and changing in proportion to the story.

This problem will get worse the more you ignore it too; You’ll forget how to play certain characters, making their personality and dialect change every time you try to use them. Eventually, they just lie in the corner of your story, as if they’re a narrating ghost who isn’t affected by anything. R.I.P.

A good way to prevent this is to write short stories starring them as the protagonist, and you can play around with them and see how they react to different situations. This not only refreshes your mind on how they truly should be played, but serves to get the imagination spurring, helping with potential story or character ideas.

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)