Are you overthinking it?

So we all like depth in a novel. We want something deep enough to take us away from reality and immerse ourselves into someone else’s world. Bu it also needs to be close enough to reality for two reasons: So we can relate to it, and so we can easily come back to reality when we need to.

Tip of today’s post : Avoid deviating too far from what your target audience is familiar with.

I’m implying here that writing something that no-one is able to relate themselves to is pointless. Be it a kid’s dream to fight dragons and goblins, or simply a perfect love story that we wish could happen in real life, (Eugh, how soppy.) it has to be something we as human beings can appreciate and understand.

Of course, we want something different to the dull, drab lives we lead day in day out. For some of us, it’s a fantasy world filled with superpowers, others it’s a calm, lax place where it’s ok to be who you are. Heck for some, it’s where it’s not ok to be who you are. Dystopian stories really hit the spot for some.

However, if we create something we fail to see as alluring (Because at the end of the day, words on paper have a mysterious charm that no-one can describe), we are unable to enjoy the story, and we’re forced back into reality all too soon. And who wants that?

Contact info:

Website: https://mantisscribeblog.wordpress.com/

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

I don’t really remember that well.

Something we all say when we try to recall a good dream. I envy the person who remembers every dream they have in a night; think of the ideas lying in those sleep-induced hallucinations! But then, it’s not just what you dream that can inspire you.

Tip of today’s post: Try to recreate dreams, or real life events in your head.

Ever told your friends a life story that you found interesting, like for example, you nearly got run over, or you’ve competed in the marathon? Chances are, you’ve exaggerated that story to grip your audience. (Yeah, that’s right, I’m lookin’ at you.) That in itself is a form of story telling.

But what if you could spontaneously create these stories without them happening in the first place? Picture this:
You’re sat on a small, wooden bench (Unpolished) facing a lake that’s been frozen over, even though it’s sunny. Geese flock the side of the lake, unable to swim in the frozen waters. And the people throw bread and watch the geese swarm and scramble over the food. What happens that involves you?

Just let that mental movie run in your mid for a bit, and sure enough, you’ll think something up. Try it with things you do in your everyday life. Think of something you do daily, and think how it could be better or worse.

Contact info:

Website: https://mantisscribeblog.wordpress.com/ (The hyperlink on my account name is broken, so I put the link here)

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

Does this really fit..?

I know exactly what you’re thinking. Stop it. Right now.

I’ve recently been looking over some of my older pieces of writing, my shorter stories, and, well, from one glance at ’em, you can tell that I’ve definitely improved since I wrote them. So much could be improved, and I guess in a few months I’ll be saying that about my current pieces.

Tip of today’s post : Proof-read, proof-read, proof-read!

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Plenty of ways to fix this.

Now I’ll admit that while I can think spontaneously, sometimes my ideas tend to be a little stupid. Very stupid, in fact, so as of recently I’ve been forcing myself to think things through a bit more when it comes to my storylines. Sounds like common practice, but to be able to deviate from one’s original plan might be tricky for some.

Tip of today’s post: Change things up if you have to!

Now this doesn’t just apply to storylines, plots or structure. It can refer to your characters too. Perhaps none of your characters fit a specific role in your story, but you don’t wanna make a new one just yet. If you can find some way to change your character without leaving the reader clueless as to why they’ve changed, you’re able to do so much more.

Now overusing this strategy may prove a little dull. We don’t need too much variety. Sometimes it may be better to create a new character or to change up the storyline, just so that your character fits the role as they should. Don’t be scared to scribble something off that planning sheet and replace it with something else. After all, you can always go back to how it originally was, you’re the boss!

Needless to say, though, ensure your changes fit the story. If you end up with a couple of seemingly out of place chapters after doing this, it’ll take a lot of work after you’ve finished your story to fix. Perhaps keep those unfitting chapters archived somewhere for future references; who knows what you can learn from your past self?

 

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

*Insert meaningful quote here*

Writing is closely associated with inspiration, because if we’re not feeling inspired, we can’t write to the best of our ability. It’s no secret that a lack of motivation can seriously inhibit your writing skills. But just where do we get inspiration on a whim?

Tip of today’s post: Find some quotes, song lyrics or words that you like.

“The darkest desires are heard only by the silent walls we build.”
-MantisScribeBlog 2016.

Something like that. Deep, meaningful and relatable are the types of quotes you wanna go for. You can really build a lot from a few short words this way, heck, most blurbs on books are essentially quotes that sum up the story in some way.

Perhaps from this quote, you symbolise walls throughout the story you tell of a young character who hides a dark desire by masking it with a light personality. Closed doors and broken walls could be really effective symbolism in such a story.

Now unless I go off on a tangent and give you a psychology lesson on how quotes can motivate, there’s not much more I can really say, except to go look for some famous quotes, or to really listen to the songs on your phone. The quotes that’ll be of the most use to you will truly stand out.

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com (Oh, the cringe)

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)

 

Have faith, man!

Warning: This is information you probably already know. I felt it was necessary to give my input. If you aren’t feeling too confident, I wanna help out.

Turns out I found a really generic but successful story destroyer. I’m gonna sound like one of those ads you see on the side of your Facebook page, but at least I’m being, what I think, is perfectly honest. And I also think it’s the biggest barrier that creativity has to break down.

Tip of today’s post : If it’s original, it’s good. Don’t believe otherwise!

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You thought you knew…

If any one reading this (Or rather, if anyone’s reading this) is like me and tries to predict every book they read, you’ll know the feeling of thinking something’s gonna happen, then it doesn’t and the story gets dragged on even further by a plot twist. I had a thought about this.

Tip of today’s post : Be crafty in the way you con your audience.

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Expect the unexpected…

There’s one big difference that a novel has from real life, something we all appreciate; the fact that the unexpected happens all the time. We all want something unexpected to happen, it just rarely does, and to include something like this when writing offers the reader the bridge from reality that they need.

Tip of today’s post : Ensure you consider how a character will react t the unexpected.

Just having a character the audience won’t expect isn’t enough, in most instances, and this is because you can get used to a character over time. You have to put them in a situation where they would never have expected to be in, or more importantly, where the reader wouldn’t expect them to be in.

In doing this, you mask various predictable plot points that would otherwise could be blatantly obvious. Say for instance you have a few armed soldiers fighting a militia of sorts. The winner is as obvious as the number of sides on a square. Then you pit them against an ancient vampire species, and things become much less clear. If they’re supposed to win, there’s much more you can do that will be completely alien, yet gripping and original to the reader.

Of course, the reader could be expecting this, and that’s why you have to make scenes like this your own. Do this by changing what happens to match your style, whatever style that may be; the reader wants to see what you can create, not what a Marvel comic or a Disney movie has shown you. (I don’t suggest at all that using these sources or any other for ideas is a bad idea though, just don’t copy them entirely.)

Contact info:

Email: eternal.mantis@gmail.com

Skype : Fenris Prisema (enraged_fenris)

(Let me know you came from my blog please, just to avoid confusion. I’m up for talking about anything.)